Question: What Drug Class Is Atropine?

What type of receptor is atropine?

Atropine is a muscarinic receptor antagonist that is used to inhibit the effects of excessive vagal activation on the heart, which is manifested as sinus bradycardia and AV nodal block..

What happens if you give too much atropine?

Excess doses of atropine sulfate may cause side effects such as palpitations, dilated pupils, difficulty swallowing, hot dry skin, thirst, dizziness, restlessness, tremor, fatigue, and problems with coordination.

What are the contraindications of atropine?

Who should not take Atropine SULFATE Syringe?overactive thyroid gland.myasthenia gravis.a skeletal muscle disorder.closed angle glaucoma.high blood pressure.coronary artery disease.chronic heart failure.chronic lung disease.More items…

When would atropine be given?

Atropine is the first-line therapy (Class IIa) for symptomatic bradycardia in the absence of reversible causes. Treatments for bradydysrhythmias are indicated when there is a structural disease of the infra-nodal system or if the heart rate is less than 50 beats/min with unstable vital signs.

What kind of medication is atropine?

Atropine is commonly classified as an anticholinergic or antiparasympathetic (parasympatholytic) drug. More precisely, however, it is termed an antimuscarinic agent since it antagonizes the muscarine-like actions of acetylcholine and other choline esters.

Does atropine slow heart rate?

Abstract. The use of atropine in cardiovascular disorders is mainly in the management of patients with bradycardia. Atropine increases the heart rate and improves the atrioventricular conduction by blocking the parasympathetic influences on the heart.

Does atropine raise blood pressure?

However, when given by itself, atropine does not exert a striking or uniform effect on blood vessels or blood pressure. Systemic doses slightly raise systolic and lower diastolic pressures and can produce significant postural hypotension.

What is atropine the antidote for?

Atropine is a prescription medicine used to treat the symptoms of low heart rate (bradycardia), reduce salivation and bronchial secretions before surgery or as an antidote for overdose of cholinergic drugs or mushroom poisoning.

How does atropine work?

Atropine is a clinically relevant anticholinergic drug, which blocks inhibitory effects of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter acetylcholine on heart rate leading to tachycardia. However, many cardiac effects of atropine cannot be adequately explained solely by its antagonism at muscarinic receptors.

What does atropine do to the eye?

This medication is used before eye examinations (e.g., refraction) and to treat certain eye conditions (e.g., uveitis). It belongs to a class of drugs known as anticholinergics. Atropine works by widening (dilating) the pupil of the eye.

Is atropine available over the counter?

Ophthalmic atropine, homatropine, and scopolamine are used to dilate (enlarge) the pupil of the eye. They are used before eye examinations, before and after eye surgery, and to treat certain eye conditions, such as uveitis or posterior synechiae. These medicines are available only with your doctor’s prescription.

What is atropine in pharmacology?

Atropine is a medication used to treat certain types of nerve agent and pesticide poisonings as well as some types of slow heart rate, and to decrease saliva production during surgery. It is typically given intravenously or by injection into a muscle.

What is the generic name for atropine?

GENERIC NAME: ATROPINE SULFATE – OPHTHALMIC (AT-roe-peen SUL-fate)

Why is atropine given?

Atropine is used to help reduce saliva, mucus, or other secretions in your airway during a surgery. Atropine is also used to treat spasms in the stomach, intestines, bladder, or other organs. Atropine is sometimes used as an antidote to treat certain types of poisoning.

Is atropine a vasodilator?

Conclusion: Atropine showed significant vasodilation effect which may derive, in part, from endothelium. Besides, atropine could inhibit the receptor-mediated Ca2+ -influx and Ca2+ -release, which was inferred to the mechanism of atropine on vasodilation.